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It’s difficult for him to ‘open the door’ to millions of Hong Kong people

It's difficult for him to 'open the door' to millions of Hong Kong people 6

It’s difficult for him to ‘open the door’ to millions of Hong Kong people

`Many people in Hong Kong fear their way of life, which China has pledged to maintain, is under threat,` British Prime Minister Boris Johnson wrote in an article published in the Times and South China Morning Post today.

Johnson’s statement came after the Chinese parliament last week passed a resolution on building a security law, criminalizing acts of `treason, secession, rebellion and subversion` targeting the central government and

Opponents fear the bill will erode the freedoms and autonomy guaranteed when Britain returned Hong Kong to China in 1997. Prime Minister Johnson also said the Hong Kong security law would `take away the rights

Therefore, Johnson affirmed that if China decides to impose the security law, London will allow overseas passport holders (BNO) to come to the UK, find work and study within 12 months, instead of 6 months as before, `

`This will be one of the biggest changes to our visa regulations in history. I hope this does not happen,` Mr. Johnson said.

According to the British Prime Minister, about 350,000 Hong Kongers currently own BNO passports and about 2.5 million others are eligible to apply for such passports.

A person holds two BNO passports during a protest against the security law in Hong Kong last month.

BNO passports are given to people born in Hong Kong before 1997, when Britain returned this territory to China.

In the Nationality Act passed by the UK in 1981, Hong Kongers are considered `British Territory Citizens` (BDTC), but do not have the right to settle in the country.

At that time, Hong Kong’s future was still undecided.

By December 1984, Chinese Prime Minister Zhao Ziyang and British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher signed the Sino-British Joint Declaration on behalf of the two governments, deciding to return Hong Kong to Beijing from July 1

According to Beijing’s memorandum, all Hong Kong people, including BDTC passport holders, are Chinese nationals.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s promise to `open up` to Hong Kong people was made in the context that London was facing a lot of criticism for its response to Covid-19 and the `divorce` with the European Union (also known as

According to Patrick Wintour, Guardian editor, the first reason may be because Prime Minister Johnson’s administration feels it needs to be responsible for Hong Kong, a British territory that used to govern before returning it to China.

`The Conservative Party will probably have some sense of guilt about their treatment of Hong Kong people,` Wintour said.

Another reason could be that London, along with other countries around the world, is trying to pressure Beijing to withdraw the security law, which is said to `erod away Hong Kong’s relatively high autonomy,` according to

Wintour believes that Johnson’s move may also come from another reason.

`The massive exodus of Hong Kongers, considered the jewel in China’s economic crown, will leave that crown severely damaged,` Wintour said.

It's difficult for him to 'open the door' to millions of Hong Kong people

Hong Kong people took to the streets to protest against the security law on May 24.

However, another question is whether the intentions of Prime Minister Johnson’s administration can be realized.

Many recent polls show that Prime Minister Johnson receives a lot of support for his proposal to grant visas to Hong Kong people.

Britain officially left the European Union on January 31, ending more than four decades of economic, political and legal integration with member states.

In addition, Britain also faces criticism from Beijing after its new moves.

`We advise Britain to step back from the brink, abandon their Cold War mentality, their colonial mindset, and recognize and respect the fact that Hong Kong has been returned,` Trieu said.

Many experts say the possibility that China will not let Hong Kong people leave is not ruled out.

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